Recipe – Rosemary-Cranberry Mulled Cider

rosemarycranberry

Your house will smell amazing when you cook this!

Serves 8

8 cups apple cider
1/4 cup honey
1 orange
2 tbsp whole cloves
1 cup cranberriers
2 5-inch cinnamon sticks
3 5-inch fresh rosemary sprigs
Additional rosemary and fresh cranberries for garnish, if desired

1. Pour apple cider into a 2.5 quart or larger crock pot or other slow cooker. Stir in honey. It may remain clumpy; that’s okay. It will dissolve when the mixture heats up.
2. With a toothpick, poke holes in the orange, about 1/2 inch to 1 inch apart. Carefully stick the cloves, pointy end down, into the holes. Add the orange to the cider along with the cranberries, cinnamon sticks, and rosemary. Push the rosemary down to help make sure it’s submerged.
3. Cook on low until hot and the cranberries have started to burst, 3-4 hours, taking care to not let the cider boil. Very carefully with a fork or masher, gently crush the remaining cranberries to pop them. They might splurt, so be careful! This will help to get as much flavor out of them without overcooking the cider.
4. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl. Add the strained cider back to the crock pot. You can also add the cinnamon sticks and orange back, as well, for a festive touch. Discard the remaining solids. Serve immediately or keep the crock pot on the warm setting to keep the cider hot.
5. Garnish individual mugs of cider with additional fresh rosemary sprigs and fresh cranberries, if desired.

The strained mulled cider can be refrigerated overnight. Reheat before serving.

You can also add Chardonnay or a dark rum for spiked flavor.

Try this delicious drink at our Open House on November 14 & 15.

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Recipe – Rosemary-Cranberry Mulled Cider

Recipe – Elsie’s Stewed Apples

StewedApples

Serves 6-8

This applesauce recipe is a tiny bit more involved than a recipe for a traditional applesauce, but the extra step of sauteing the apples is worth it. Use tart local apples; avoid apples that have a mealy texture and that are overly sweet. The best thing to do is to go to your farmers’ market or local produce stand and taste as many apples as you can, choosing the one that is most appealing (no pun intended).

2-3 tbsp unsalted butter

2 lbs apples, peeled, cored, and cut into thick slices

1/2 cup honey, preferably sage honey

1/2 cup white wine

zest of 1 lemon

juice of 1 lemon

fresh sage sprigs for garnish (optional)

1. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the apples, turn the heat to high, and saute until they begin to brown on the edges, about 5 minutes. If some are getting too well done, remove them and place on a plate while the rest continue to cook, then return them to the skillet when all are done.

2. Reduce the heat to low and add the honey, wine, lemon zest, lemon juice, and 1/2 cup of water. Cover and allow to cook until the apples are tender but still firm; you don’t want them to turn into applesauce!

3. Serve this is a bowl, tuck in a couple sprigs of fresh sage from your garden, and tell your guests all about sage honey.


Find more honey recipes in the book at Johnson’s:

Masterton, Laurey. (2013). The Fresh Honey Cookbook. North Adams, MA: Storey Publishing.

Photo by Johnny Autry.

Recipe – Elsie’s Stewed Apples