Recipe – Winter Fruit-Stuffed Pork Tenderloin

PorkTenderloinServes 8

1/2 cup dried apricots

1/2 cup dried cherries

1/2 cup dried figs

2 pork tenderloins (about 3 lbs total)

1 tsp salt

1 tsp freshly ground black pepper

1 cup crumbled blue cheese

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

4 tbsp butter

1/4 cup honey, preferably sourwood honey

  1. Mince the apricots, cherries, and figs by hand or in a food processor.
  2. Slice the tenderloins lengthwise, almost all the way through. Open them up and lay them flat. Place each tenderloin on a large piece of plastic wrap. Cover with another piece of plastic wrap and pound each piece of meat with a meat tenderizer until it is about 1/2 inch thick. Remove the top piece of plastic.
  3. Season the surface of the pork with the salt and pepper. Divide the fruit mixture in half and spread evenly on the cut surface of each tenderloin. Top each with half of the cheese. Roll up each tenderloin, using the bottom piece of plastic to help you, tucking in the fruit and cheese as you go. Tie kitchen string every 2 inches around the tenderloin, continuing to push in any fruit or cheese that may fall out.
  4. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  5. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Sear the tied tenderloins, turning as each side is browned. Be careful when searing the open side, as some fruit and cheese might fall out. You are just trying to seal in the meat juices, not trying to cook the pork all the way through.
  6. Combine the butter and honey in a microwaveable bowl and microwave on high for about 20 seconds, or until the butter is melted. Drizzle the butter over the tenderloins.
  7. Place the tenderloins on a baking sheet. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the meat reaches an internal temperature of 150°F. Remove the baking sheet and allow the tenderloins to sit for at least 10 minutes before slicing. This will keep the juices in the meat rather than all over your kitchen counter.
  8. Snip off and discard the strings. Slice the pork into 1 inch thick pieces and serve.

Find more honey recipes in the book at Johnson’s:

Masterton, Laurey. (2013). The Fresh Honey Cookbook. North Adams, MA: Storey Publishing.

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Recipe – Winter Fruit-Stuffed Pork Tenderloin

Recipe – Fruit Beer Float

fruitbeerfloat

Wild and sour ales, beers made with wild yeasts that impart appealing acidity developed over extended time spent either in steel tanks or wood barrels, are a joy to pair with the right foods.

Serves 1

3/4 cup American Wild Ale with fruit

1 giant scoop good-quality vanilla ice cream

Raspberries for garnish (optional)

Pour the ale into a stemmed tulip glass. Carefully slip in the scoop of ice cream. It’s important to add the ice cream to the beer, rather than vice versa, to ensure that it will float and not stick to the bottom of the glass. Garnish with two or three raspberries, if desired. Serve immediately with a spoon and straw.

Recipe – Fruit Beer Float

DIY – Market Arrangement

MarketArrangement

No matter what time of year, there is always a flower, herb, vegetable, or fruit that can inspire you to make a fun “garden-to-table” arrangement. Choose a simple vessel such as an empty tin can with a cool label, a mason jar, or a vintage vase from your own collection, and go to town clipping in your yard! Build the arrangement with a sturdy base using a variety of greenery and herbs, nestle in a few choice blooms that pack a visual punch, and then layer in some fruit for textural interest. For example, we’ve used grapes, dahlias, mint, lemon verbena, feverfew, jujubes, yarrow, zinnias, and heuchera in the arrangement above.

As florist, one of the simplest tricks of our trade is skewering fruit or vegetables to include in our arrangements. You can do this by taking a small apple, pretty pear, or cute jujube fruit and inserting a bamboo skewer into one end, making sure not to push the skewer all the way through it. Cut the skewer down to size and nestle the fruit into the arrangement just like the stem of a flower. A bright bunch of grapes or crab apple-laden branch can make a surprising impact cascading down the front of your arrangement.


Find the book at Johnson’s

Bennett, Leslie and Stefani Bittner. (2013). The Beautiful Edible Garden. Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press.

Arrangement: Studio Choo

Photo: Jill Rizzo

DIY – Market Arrangement