Recipe – Fruit Beer Float

fruitbeerfloat

Wild and sour ales, beers made with wild yeasts that impart appealing acidity developed over extended time spent either in steel tanks or wood barrels, are a joy to pair with the right foods.

Serves 1

3/4 cup American Wild Ale with fruit

1 giant scoop good-quality vanilla ice cream

Raspberries for garnish (optional)

Pour the ale into a stemmed tulip glass. Carefully slip in the scoop of ice cream. It’s important to add the ice cream to the beer, rather than vice versa, to ensure that it will float and not stick to the bottom of the glass. Garnish with two or three raspberries, if desired. Serve immediately with a spoon and straw.

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Recipe – Fruit Beer Float

Recipe – Pansy Cake with Edible Dirt

PansyCake

Cake:

2 sticks margarine/butter/or substitute
3 heaping Tablespoons cocoa powder
1 cup water
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ cup buttermilk
2 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a medium saucepan, melt margarine, cocoa and water and bring to a rapid boil, then
pour boiled mixture over sugar, flour, and baking powder. Mix together.

In a separate bowl add the baking soda to the buttermilk.

Add beaten eggs, vanilla and buttermilk/soda mixture to the flour-cocoa mixture.
Pour in two greased 8-inch round cake pans.

Bake 25 minutes at 350°F or until done when tested with a toothpick.

Frosting:

4 cups confectioner’s sugar
4 Tablespoons butter, softened
4 Tablespoons whole milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
red and blue food coloring

In a mixing bowl combine all ingredients and beat until smooth and fluffy. Combine red and blue coloring to create desired purple color.

Top cake with crushed Oreos and edible pansies.


Recipe and photos from: Rikki Snyder

Recipe – Pansy Cake with Edible Dirt

Recipe – Baked Crab Dip

BakedCrabDip

Makes about 2 cups.

Fresh crab meat is so rich, fabulous, and sweet that, for this dip, I wanted to highlight the texture and flavor of the crab without masking it. Served bubbly hot with a crisply browned, lemon zest-panko topping, this dip will be a party favorite – easy to put together, quick to bake, and quick to disappear, too.

6 oz. fresh crabmeat, well drained

1/2 cup diced red bell pepper/capsicum

1/2 cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

3 tbsp snipped fresh chives

1/2 cup reduced fat mayonnaise

4 oz. whipped cream cheese

1 1/2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

1/2 tsp hot sauce, such as Tabasco

1/4 cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs)

1/2 tsp grated lemon zest

1. Place the crabmeat in a medium bowl and flake with your fingers. Stir in the bell pepper/capsicum, parsley, and chives. Using a rubber spatula, gently stir in the mayonnaise, cream cheese, lemon juice, and hot sauce. Transfer to a 1 qt/1 L shallow baking dish. In a small bowl, combine the panko and lemon zest.

2. Position a rack in the upper third of the oven and preheat the oven to 425°F. Just before baking, sprinkle the panko mixture on top and bake until the panko is toasty brown and the dip is bubbling at the edges, about 12 minutes. Serve hot.

Dip do-ahead: The dip, without the panko topping, can be prepared, covered, and refrigerated up to 1 day in advance. Remove from the refrigerator 30 minutes before baking. The topping can be prepared up to 8 hours ahead and sprinkled on just before baking.


Find more recipes in the book at Johnson’s

Morgan, Diane. (2010). Skinny Dips. San Francisco, CA: Chronicle Books.

Photo by Sheri Giblin

Recipe – Baked Crab Dip

Recipe – Elsie’s Stewed Apples

StewedApples

Serves 6-8

This applesauce recipe is a tiny bit more involved than a recipe for a traditional applesauce, but the extra step of sauteing the apples is worth it. Use tart local apples; avoid apples that have a mealy texture and that are overly sweet. The best thing to do is to go to your farmers’ market or local produce stand and taste as many apples as you can, choosing the one that is most appealing (no pun intended).

2-3 tbsp unsalted butter

2 lbs apples, peeled, cored, and cut into thick slices

1/2 cup honey, preferably sage honey

1/2 cup white wine

zest of 1 lemon

juice of 1 lemon

fresh sage sprigs for garnish (optional)

1. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the apples, turn the heat to high, and saute until they begin to brown on the edges, about 5 minutes. If some are getting too well done, remove them and place on a plate while the rest continue to cook, then return them to the skillet when all are done.

2. Reduce the heat to low and add the honey, wine, lemon zest, lemon juice, and 1/2 cup of water. Cover and allow to cook until the apples are tender but still firm; you don’t want them to turn into applesauce!

3. Serve this is a bowl, tuck in a couple sprigs of fresh sage from your garden, and tell your guests all about sage honey.


Find more honey recipes in the book at Johnson’s:

Masterton, Laurey. (2013). The Fresh Honey Cookbook. North Adams, MA: Storey Publishing.

Photo by Johnny Autry.

Recipe – Elsie’s Stewed Apples

Recipe – Tulip Ice Cream Bowls

TulipIceCreamBowl

There are plenty of edible ice cream containers out there, but none so fetching as a tulip. A lovely tulip brimming with creamy ice cream is a sight to behold. I like to add a couple of fresh berries and a splash of tulip syrup. Serves 4.

4 tulip blossoms, stamens and pistils removed

4 large or 12 small scoops of ice cream

1 pint fresh berries

Several tablespoons tulip syrup (see below)

Prop each tulip in a container that will help it stand upright, such as an eggcup or a champagne flute. Place 1 large scoop (or 3 small scoops) ice cream in each tulip. Drizzle a little tulip syrup over each and place a few fresh berries on the top. Serve immediately!

Tulip Syrup

Colorful flower-infused simple syrups have oh so many hues. Strong and sweet, they are best used as bases in other recipes, such as sorbets or drink mixes.

2 cups sugar

1 cup water

The petals of 2 tulips (about 2 cups)

Dissolved sugar in water over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until it reaches a simmer. Place flowers in a nonreactive bowl (by that I mean glass, enamel, or stainless steel). Pour hot syrup over top and let stand for at least 30 minutes. Strain the mixture and discard the flowers. (I know it is a shame to discard the flowers, but you must unless you are using the syrup right away). Floral simple syrup ca be stored in the fridge for 1 or 2 months. If it begins to crystallize, simply heat it again until smooth. Makes 2 cups (1 pint).

This recipe makes a vicious simple syrup. For a thinner version, use 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water. Either type will work well in recipes that call for simple syrup.

Tulips make pretty edible bowls for ice creams, sorbets, and salads.


Find the book at Johnson’s for more recipes

Bacher, Miche.(2013). Cooking with Flowers. Philadelpha, PA: Quirk Books.

Photo: halfbakedharvest.com

Recipe – Tulip Ice Cream Bowls

Recipe – Hibiscus Popsicles

hibiscuspops

My friend Joe introduced me to the simple delight that is hibiscus in champagne. He dropped a candied hibiscus into the bottom of my glass, and I was head over heels. You’ve got to try Joe’s drink in pop form – it’s the best of both worlds. Makes 10-12 popsicles, depending on mold size.

2 cups hibiscus simple syrup (see below)

2 cups champagne

Stir together simple syrup and champagne. Let stand until mixture stops fizzing. Pour into pop molds and freeze.

Hibiscus Champagne

Store-bought candied hibiscus are destined for bubbly. Drop them into glasses of cool champagne and drink up!

Hibiscus Simple Syrup

Colorful flower-infused simple syrups have oh so many hues. Strong and sweet, they are best used as bases in other recipes, such as sorbets or drink mixes.

2 cups sugar

1 cup water

2 tbsp to 1 cup fresh or dried flowers

Dissolved sugar in water over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until it reaches a simmer. Place flowers in a nonreactive bowl (by that I mean glass, enamel, or stainless steel). Pour hot syrup over top and let stand for at least 30 minutes. Strain the mixture and discard the flowers. (I know it is a shame to discard the flowers, but you must unless you are using the syrup right away). Floral simple syrup ca be stored in the fridge for 1 or 2 months. If it begins to crystallize, simply heat it again until smooth. Makes 2 cups (1 pint).

This recipe makes a vicious simple syrup. For a thinner version, use 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water. Either type will work well in recipes that call for simple syrup.


Find the book at Johnson’s for more recipes

Bacher, Miche.(2013). Cooking with Flowers. Philadelpha, PA: Quirk Books.

Photo: halfbakedharvest.com

Recipe – Hibiscus Popsicles

Recipe – Lavender Lemonade

lavenderlemonade

Delightfully refreshing, lavender lemonade is a great way to showcase your skill at making flower simple syrups. Makes 6 cups (1 1/2 quarts).

1 cup lavender simple syrup (see below)

1 cup lemon juice

4 cups water

Mix ingredients directly in the pitcher – don’t bother dirtying up one more thing. Adjust the flavors according to your own taste preferences.

Lavender Simple Syrup

Colorful flower-infused simple syrups have oh so many hues. Strong and sweet, they are best used as bases in other recipes, such as sorbets or drink mixes.

2 cups sugar

1 cup water

2 tbsp lavender buds

* Lavender is a potent herb, and this syrup will get stronger the longer you let it infuse, so be careful to taste for your own preferences.

Dissolved sugar in water over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until it reaches a simmer. Place flowers in a nonreactive bowl (by that I mean glass, enamel, or stainless steel). Pour hot syrup over top and let stand for at least 30 minutes. Strain the mixture and discard the flowers. (I know it is a shame to discard the flowers, but you must unless you are using the syrup right away). Floral simple syrup ca be stored in the fridge for 1 or 2 months. If it begins to crystallize, simply heat it again until smooth. Makes 2 cups (1 pint).

This recipe makes a vicious simple syrup. For a thinner version, use 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water. Either type will work well in recipes that call for simple syrup.


Find the book at Johnson’s for more recipes

Bacher, Miche.(2013). Cooking with Flowers. Philadelpha, PA: Quirk Books.

Photo: thesharedsip.com

Recipe – Lavender Lemonade